Bay Laurel Essential Oil

Botanical Name

Alternative Names

Laurus nobilis

Laurel leaf, Sweet bay

Source Location

Plant part used

Yugoslavia, Mediterranean

Leaves

Extraction Method

Color

Steam distilled

Clear

Consistency

Aroma Strength

Thin

Medium

Fragrance

Floral, woody and spicy; camphorous scent

Benefits/Uses/Systems

Digestive support and stimulant, toothache, mouth infection, loss of appetite, liver tonic, colitis, TB, flatulence; immune stimulant, viral infections, ear aches, fevers, swollen glands, colds, flu; kidney tonic, reproductive support, regulates menstruation, childbirth; vaso-dilator, high blood pressure, anticoagulant, support for Hodgkin’s disease; dandruff, bruises, scars, scabies, necrotic/gangrene (after medical attention) aid, lice, skin vermin; general aches and pains, arthritis, rheumatism, sclerosis; pneumonia, pulmonary regenerator, chronic bronchitis; dizziness, depression, anxiety, mildly narcotic

Blends Well With

Basil, Bergamot, Clary Sage, Clove, Cypress, Ginger, Juniper Berry, Lavender, Lemon, Myrrh, Orange, Oregano, Patchouli, Pine, Rosemary, Thyme

Main Constituents

a-pinene, B-pinene, myrcene, limonene, linalool, methyl chavicol, neral, a-terpineol, geranyl acetate, eugenol, cavicol

Properties

Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antibacterial, antioxidant, astringent, carminative, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, emetic, stomachic, antiseptic, antibiotic, analgesic, anti-neuralgic, antispasmodic, aperitif, emmenagogue, febrifuge, insecticide, cholagogue, sedative, sudorific and tonic, blood thinner, hypotensive, bactericidal

Safety

Can cause dermatitis or sensitization. Avoid if pregnant. Avoid overuse due to narcotic effect