Anise Seed Essential Oil

Botanical Name

Alternative Names

Pimpinella anisum

Anise Star, erroneously

Source Location

Plant part used

Mediterranean, Middle East, Asia

Seeds

Extraction Method

Color

Steam distillation

Clear

Consistency

Aroma Strength

Thin

Medium

Fragrance

Like licorice; rich and sweet

Benefits/Uses/Systems

Digestive system aid, nausea, flatulence, hangover, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps; respiratory aid, cough, asthma, pulmonary congestion and bronchitis. Helps menstrual cramps, promotes menstruation, period pain and cramps, frigidity, impotence, childbirth, menopause. Use to increase milk production while nursing. Is an aphrodisiac. Migraine headaches; skin issues including infections, scabies, lice and mites. Circulatory stimulant, heart palpitations, atrial fibrillation, angina; muscle aches, rheumatism, lumbago.

Blends Well With

Bay, Black Pepper, Cajeput, Caraway, Chamomile, Eucalyptus, Ginger, Lavender, Myrrh, Orange, Pine, Petitgrain, Rose, Rosewood

Constituents

a-pinene, camphene, B-pinene, linalool, cis-anethole, trans-anethole, safrole, anisaldehyde, acetoanisole. Has estrogen-like effects

Properties

Antiemetic, antiepileptic, antihysteric, antirheumatic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitussive, aperient, carminative, cordial, decongestant, digestive, diuretic, expectorant, insecticide, insect repellant, laxative, relaxant, sedative, digestive stimulant, stupifier and vermifuge

Safety

Has narcotic properties and slows circulation, causes sluggishness, even coma in large doses. Avoid if pregnant, and in cases of endometriosis and estrogen-dependent cancers.